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top reasons to live in halls

Top reasons to live in halls

With just a couple of weeks to go before new students – also known as ‘freshers’ - descend on campuses across the UK, we’ve pulled together the best things about living in halls of residence at university…

You may feel that living with a bunch of people you don’t know really daunting, but give it a few weeks and you and your new flatmates will be best buddies – and probably, if my experience is anything to go by, friends for life.

Thinking back, I don’t think I worried too much about moving into halls. I knew there were going to be 11 other girls living in my flat so I figured I was bound to get on with at least a handful, if not all.

My days of uni pre-dated Facebook so I couldn’t even connect with my new flatmates before I started. Will they like me? Will I fit in? Will I like them? How will I make a good first impression? Some of the questions that popped into my head before moving in day. But if you be yourself and make sure you don’t annoy your flatmates by leaving all your stuff and dirty pots and pans around the place and pinching all the food out of the fridge, then you’ll do just fine.

My top reasons to live in halls…

  1. It’s easy to make friends and ease yourself in to independent living – you’re all in the same boat, you’ll all probably move in on the same day, so it’s a great way to meet people from the get go. There is a great community feel too when everyone gets along.*

  2. You will never have a dull moment – most halls accommodate around 6 plus students depending on how big it is.  Not only will this mean you will rarely be alone when you are missing your friends and family, but there will be plenty of stuff going on whether it’s on your floor or in other parts of the building – often house parties, yay!

  3. Talking of house parties – yes there will be loads of these in halls. The added bonus is that you won’t have to leave your flat (unless it’s in another block).

  4. You don’t have to cook for yourself – choosing halls doesn’t mean you have to cook. Some halls are catered. You may also be lucky as I was to live with people who love to cook - just make sure you help out or do the washing up!

  5. You’ll be within walking distance of uni – even if your halls is off campus, you won’t be that far away from uni. Roll out of bed, straight into a lecture!

  6. You’ll have people to live with in your second and third year – most people decide to leave halls after their first year (some unis only let first years live in halls) and many choose to live with friends made there.

  7. Chance to meet different types of people – I lived with a diverse bunch from different countries and parts of the UK, studying a range of courses. I found there was always someone to lean on for support, as well as course work help (there’s bound to be at least one brainbox in your flat!)

  8. Your room probably won’t be that big but your lean how to utilise space sensibly.

  9. Traffic cones and road signs – you’ll probably see these turn up in your kitchen – they may look odd at first but then become part of the furniture and a must have home accessory. Just make sure you return them when you leave!

  10. Getting things fixed for you – if the lights aren’t working, taps are leaking or the oven is broke, a simple call to maintenance and the problem will be fixed in no time.

*Remember, if you find yourself in halls and not enjoying it or getting on with your flatmates, there will be people you can speak to at your university’s accommodation team. Sometimes room/flat changes may be possible.

Did you live in halls? Do you have any tips to share with new students? Tweet us at @glyndwruni


About the Author

Antonia Jones

Antonia Jones

Antonia graduated in journalism and worked a decade in local and regional news media before joining Wrexham Glyndwr University in 2013 as media and communications manager. She is now the university's digital communications manager.

To get in touch with Antonia please email Antonia.jones@glyndwr.ac.uk

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