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John McClenaghen

Programme Leader, Fine Art

Staff Profile

John McClenaghen

Room: R43

Phone:

+44 (0) 1978 293537

Email:

j.mcclenaghen@glyndwr.ac.uk

He has an MA in Fine Art from the University of Liverpool, a BA (Hons) in Fine Art from the Glasgow School of Art and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. John has taught within a number of Art Schools as far apart as Yorkshire and Essex.

As an artist he explores how time, change and the experience of space can form a dialogue with the decision making process in painting. His work has often extended painting into installation and assemblage. Recently he has employed 3D digital mapping, which ironically displaces the uniqueness of the original painted surface while providing access to the layers of decisions that define it as a practice.

Collaborative works include Seeing Walls (Shanghai) and Distance (Sofia) with Alec Shepley and most recently niuR (ruin in reverse) with digital artist Simon Hall as part of Carbon meets Silicon at Oriel Sycharth in Wrexham.

“Professional artists learn in the studio; they speculate, they take risks, they test ideas in materials in an attempt to give them form, they problem solve and they problem find. I believe that it is important to educate Fine Art students in a way that encourages them to learn in a manner that is close to the art practice they will employ as graduates.“

 

John McClenaghen

John is a Fine Art graduate of The Glasgow School of Art and also holds a Masters in Fine Art from the University of Liverpool.

John is currently completing his PhD.

I have recently contributed a book chapter to the forthcoming publication;

‘Teaching painting, How is painting taught in British art schools’ Black Dog Publishing, September 2016. I have also recently contributed to 'Transitions out of art school' soon to be published by Q-Art. Other recent publications include:

Wrexham Print International catalogue, 2011. Y Lle Celf, National Eisteddfod of Wales catalogue, 2011. Distance 2 Sofia, National Academy of Art, Sofia/Beehive Press, 2010 Distance, Avenue Gallery, Northampton, Beehive Press, 2010.

Facing North, Maiden Bridge Arts Centre, 2008. Seeing Walls, Arts council Wales, Vanguard Gallery Shanghai 2006

Recent Exhibitions include: Moving Minds (2016), Oriel Sycharth Gallery, Carbon Meets Silicon (2015), Oriel Sycharth Gallery, Facing North (2013), Storey Institute Gallery Lancaster Play Serious, Research Exposition 20-22 NW, Manchester (2012), Distance 2 Sofia, Academia Gallery, National Academy of Art, Sofia, Bulgaria (2011), Y Lle Celf, Visual Arts Exhibition of the National Eisteddfod of Wales (2011), Wrexham Print International (2011) Oriel Wrecsam (Touring Exhibition).

The prevalent use of the term Art Practice promises, but seldom delivers, an encounter with the processes through which strategies are formed and ideas are tested through action in materials or mediated through the use of technologies. I explore how the conditions of the contexts of research, exhibition and education act against the exposition and experience of action and reflection by an audience, rather than the realization of concept as form. Practice is in time. It is durational. Art objects are frozen in time. They represent practice but they are not practice. They are representations in the Cartesian sense. They stand in for that which is absent. Practice in relation to exhibition or art education is generally somewhere else. Yet the art of practicing always exists in the here and now and is by extension event.  Hence the exposition of art practice as decisions in materials brings about the ruin of representation and holds the potential for new approaches to exhibition and the pedagogy of art practice.

As an artist I explore how time, change and the experience of space can form a dialogue with the decision making process in painting. My art practice has often extended painting into installation and assemblage. Recently I have employed 3D digital mapping, which ironically displaces the uniqueness of the original painted surface while providing access to the layers of decisions that define it as a practice.

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