Publishing and Censorship


September 30 – November 19 2014

Private View September 30, 5 – 7pm

A collection of works selected by Rory McCartney.

Censorship raises complex cultural, philosophical, political and ethical questions regarding authorship. The works in this show highlight how the limitations of censorship can be explored and dissected with creative outcomes. This exhibition comprises a selection of published works, within those debates, that vary in format, period, and geographic origin. Comparisons can be drawn between contemporary and historical material; high and low culture in printed form; recorded sound and moving image.

The exhibition is comprised of a selection of artefacts dating from 1585 through to contemporary items. The books, posters, prints, photographs and sound recordings shape a discussion around the suppression of public communication, and the cultural and political effects of a censored press.

The exhibition includes work by Caravaggio, Francisco Goya, Alexander Rodchenko, Kourosh Yaghmaei and Patrick Cariou vs. Richard Prince.

A catalogue has been produced to accompany the exhibition which can be downloaded here.


View pictures of the Private View here.



Publishing + Censorship (Bootleg)

 

This show is running concurrently with an exhibition at the LimaZulu Project Space in London from the 2nd — 8th October. For this exhibition the works have been reproduced on a full size scale, reconstructed and represented in the space as part of the double occupancy. The literal and radical compression of the material allows for unexpected relationships to be interpreted between the works. The intention is to reorganise the material in the show, displaying it side-by-side where the viewer has no boundaries or protection systems between works, which can then be viewed in a flattened landscape. This allows the conceptual values of the material to be explored within the immaterial and uniform format of the reproductions.

“Bootlegs should not be confused with counterfeit or pirated recordings, which are merely unauthorised duplicates of officially released recordings, often attempting to resemble the official product as close as possible. Some bootleggers are keen to stress that the markets for bootleg and counterfeit recordings are different.”

Heylin, Clinton (1994).

LIMAZULU PROJECT
www.limazulu.co.uk

Publishing and Censorship
 
Publishing and Censorship
 
Publishing and Censorship
 
Publishing and Censorship
 
Publishing and Censorship
 
Publishing and Censorship